Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association (BBRSDA) made public the resignation of president and founding member Robert Heyano in a release on Wednesday "with sincere regret."

The sockeye escapement goals for most of Bristol Bay’s rivers are changing. Members of an 18 month study recommended widening the ranges rather than just raising them, and the Department of Fish and Game has now adopted those ranges. Then the Alaska Board of Fish added language requiring management for the low end of escapement on small run years, and the high end during years with bigger runs.

Wild Alaska salmon processed into a powder is a work in progress of the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute, in an effort to market millions of pounds of the fish, while providing protein to hungry people worldwide.

Nutritionists contracted by ASMI are currently concentrating on making the salmon powder as “sensory neutral” as possible, said Bruce Schactler, of Kodiak, who heads up ASMI’s global food aid program.

Legislation by Rep. Bryce Edgmon, D- Dillingham, to establish Alaska Wild Salmon Day annually on Aug. 10, is moving through the House, co-sponsored by Representatives Bob Herron, D-Bethel, and Mike Chenault, R-Nikiski.

Egmon's bill would celebrate the enormous bounty that wild king, sockeye, coho, chum and pink salmon bring to Alaska every year.
- See more at: http://www.thecordovatimes.com/article/1513saluting-salmon#sthash.pOTTGb...

Another election cycle is underway for the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association, with two candidates each vying for the Alaska resident and non-Alaska resident seats respectively.

Ballots went out on March 11 to the Bristol Bay drift gillnet permit holders represented by the association. To be counted as votes, they had to be postmarked by April 10 and received by the BBRSDA by April 17.

Alaska Congressman Don Young has introduced a bill to reauthorize the Magnuson-Stevens Act, the nation’s primary law governing fishing in federal waters. It leaves fisheries managers some controversial wiggle room.

Previous versions of the law established eight regional councils and required them to set harvest limits based on science to end overfishing. The mechanism is known as the “Alaska Model” of fisheries management.

JUNEAU -- Gov. Bill Walker has made a second try at filling a vacant seat on the Alaska Board of Fisheries, this time picking the director of a Kenai Peninsula conservation group for a position traditionally held by members sympathetic to sportfishing interests.

After an odd Alaska winter of record-warm temperatures and pouring rain instead of snow, will summer be weird as well?

While scientists say more such winters can be expected in Alaska in the long term as the climate heats up, predicting what will happen in the short term is iffy. Still, resource managers are making some contingency plans for a challenging summer, and scientists have some advice in case the next few months are as unusual as the last few.

The Aleutian Marketplace contest was designed to gather ideas and provide funding for new start-up businesses around the Bering Sea.

As the competition heads into its second round, one winner is asking for extra support -- and a chance to turn his recipe for success into the real thing. KUCB’s Lauren Rosenthal reports....

Researchers and fish and wildlife experts are gathering in Dillingham this week for the annual Southwest Interagency Meeting. How the low snow pack and warmer water temperature this year can affect the health of Chinook salmon runs was the topic of a presentation Tuesday. KDLG’s Matt Martin has more....

This year marks 40 years since the passage of landmark Congressional legislation that fundamentally overhauled how the $90 billion U.S. commercial fisheries industry is managed. It established a unique public-private partnership in which the industry, working with scientists and both federal and local authorities, would regulate fishing according to agreed-upon scientific standards for environmental sustainability, even as the industry stretched to meet skyrocketing demand for seafood.

U.S. Senator Lisa Murkowski has again brought forward a bill which aims to fully investigate impacts of “Frankenfish”.

Alaska has a lot of boats - a lot of old boats - doing a lot of business in Alaska.

Such was the take-away message from those involved with a recent report documenting the trends and opportunities for the maritime support sector in Alaska.

The report, completed for the Alaska Department of Commerce, Community and Economic Development by the McDowell Group, was the focus of a recent presentation to participants at the Southwest Alaska Municipal Conference.

March 15: Today, the Presidential Task Force on Illegal, Unreported, and Unregulated (IUU) Fishing and Seafood Fraud, co-chaired by the Departments of Commerce and State, released its action plan. This plan articulates the aggressive steps that federal agencies will take both domestically and internationally to implement the recommendations the Task Force made in December 2014.

Gov. Bill Walker nominated Daniel Hull, a commercial fisherman from Cordova, to serve a second term on the North Pacific Fishery Management Council and named Andrew Mezirow, a sport fishing charter operator from Seward, to a second seat on the council.

The nominations, made Friday to the U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service, must be approved by the federal government.

JUNEAU -- Commercial fishermen who make their living in federal waters off Alaska are watching as Gov. Bill Walker prepares to announce a set of appointments to the board that manages the multibillion-dollar fishing industry in the North Pacific.

One of the principal roles of the North Pacific Fishery Management Council is overseeing the massive, Seattle-based factory fishing vessels that catch and process lower-value groundfish like pollock, mackerel and sole.

Federal fisheries managers are slated to take final action in early April on the incidental harvest of Chinook and chum salmon in the Bering Sea pollock fishery.

Also on the agenda for the April 6-13 meeting of the North Pacific Fishery Management Council in Anchorage are final action on Gulf of Alaska sablefish longline pots, an update on Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands salmon bycatch genetics, a discussion paper on Area 4A halibut retention in sablefish pots, and an initial review of observer coverage on small catcher processors.

The Alaska Board of Fisheries will meet next week (March 17-20) in Anchorage for the last meeting of the 2014-2015 Board cycle. Among issues for discussion are two proposals that may affect Bristol Bay fisheries.

March 3, 2015 -- In a letter to Paula A. Kerger, President and CEO of Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) which is attached and pasted below, the Seafood Coalition pointed out the inappropriateness of a publicly funded network using glaring distortions to hype an upcoming PBS miniseries.

Dozens of Alaska Natives poured into a state Supreme Court hearing to show support for subsistence users in a case involving former state Sen. Albert Kookesh, who was cited along with two others in 2009 for exceeding salmon harvest limits while subsistence fishing in Southeast Alaska.

JUNEAU -- Lawmakers on Tuesday plan to discuss a bill that would make personal use a priority in managing state fisheries.

The bill, from Republican Sen. Bill Stoltze of Chugiak, would direct the Alaska Department of Fish and Game to prioritize state fisheries for personal use when restrictions are necessary.

Satomi Inaba grew up eating her mother’s boiled fish and mackerel sushi, but like many younger Japanese consumers today favors turf over surf in her own kitchen. Seafood she considers more troublesome to prepare and, frankly, rather smelly.

“Although I like (the) taste of seafood, among all kinds of flesh, I actually prepare chicken, pork, or beef more often than seafood,” Inaba, 39, wrote in an email interview from her home in Osaka.

The experimental fishery to determine the feasibility of a seine fishery for pollock in state waters has finished up with mixed results.

The Gulf of Alaska pollock workgroup held its final meeting last month to discuss adding a limited entry state pollock fishery to Alaska waters for both trawl and non-trawl vessels and go over the results of the experimental fishery.

JUNEAU, Alaska - A Ketchikan lawmaker is proposing that no seine vessels longer than 58 feet can fish in state salmon fisheries.

Rep. Dan Ortiz said the bill he introduced Wednesday would protect fishing and processing opportunities for Alaskans by limiting the size of boats seining for salmon.

Bonnie Bruce arrives to Congressman Young’s office after two decades on the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Fisheries, Wildlife, Oceans, and Insular Affairs as a Professional Legislative staff member. Originally hired in 1995 by then Chairman Don Young, Bonnie has worked to develop and implement legislative policy in the areas of fisheries, marine mammals, wildlife, and insular affairs.

The Chum Trollers Association said in its proposal that trollers aren’t getting their share of hatchery salmon based on a plan put in place in 1994, and that the board should direct the Northern Regional Planning Teams, the Northern Southeast Regional Aquaculture Association and Douglas Island Pink and Chum to develop a new management plan.

A limited entry state waters pollock fishery could ease some of the impending Gulf of Alaska rationalization headaches, but the experimental permits fishing for pollock with non-trawl gear haven’t yet proven their value.

A working group of stakeholders and fisheries officials met for the third and last time on Feb. 18 to discuss adding a limited entry state pollock fishery to Alaska waters for both trawl and non-trawl vessels.

The three-member commission that oversees Alaska’s lucrative limited-entry commercial fisheries is urging lawmakers not to pursue proposals for elimination for at least another year.

The state Commercial Fisheries Entry Commission is under fire as a more than $3.5 billion budget shortfall looms. A critical report by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game makes a case for overhaul, citing permit processing delays and relatively high payroll costs. Proposed legislation, House Bill 112, would repeal the commission and move its duties to Fish and Game.